Skip to Main Content
Sign In

Current Courses

Image Picker for Section 0

Courses being offered in Fall 2021 which satisfy Arts and Sciences Group Requirements 

Group A

PHIL 100          Philosophies of Life

PHIL 105          Critical Thinking

PHIL 201          Social and Political Philosophy

PHIL 202          Contemporary Moral Problems

PHIL 203          Ethics                          

PHIL 204          World Religions

PHIL 208          Introduction to Jewish Philosophy

PHIL 216          Introduction to Feminist Theory

PHIL 307          Black Thought & Philosophy

PHIL 310          Chinese Religion & Philosophy

PHIL 320          Theory of Knowledge

PHIL 448          Environmental Ethics

Group B

PHIL 101          Great Western Philosophers

PHIL 210          Women and Religion

PHIL 301          Ancient Philosophy

PHIL 303          Modern Philosophy      

Group C

Group D

PHIL 205          Logic

Courses that satisfy Arts and Sciences Second Writing Requirement

PHIL 465          Senior Seminar

Courses that satisfy University Multicultural Requirement

PHIL 204          World Religions

PHIL 208          Introduction to Jewish Philosophy

PHIL 210          Women and Religion

PHIL 216          Introduction to Feminist Theory

PHIL 307          Black Thought & Philosophy

PHIL 310          Chinese Religion & Philosophy

 

 

Women and Religion TR 2:00-3:15 pm<p>(Laberge (Cross List:  WOMS 210-010) </p><p>Examines the impact of Near Eastern and Judeo-Christian scriptures on women in the family and society especially focusing on women's roles as mystics and leaders within and outside of institutional religion.  Also covers recent feminist approaches to religion.<br></p>
Women and Religion TR 3:30-4:45<p>Laberge  (Cross List:  WOMS 210-010) </p><p>Examines the impact of Near Eastern and Judeo-Christian scriptures on women in the family and society especially focusing on women's roles as mystics and leaders within and outside of institutional religion.  Also covers recent feminist approaches to religion.</p>
Philosophies of LifeMW 3:35-4:50Jordan, Jeffrey J.jjjordan<p>​Plato, Christianity, Marxism, Freud, and Naturalism are among the theories we will look at this semester.  The course is a survey of six theories concerning the nature of humanity.  There will be three tests.</p>
Philosophies of LifeMW 5:00-6:15Jordan, Jeffrey J.jjjordan<p><strong>Plato, Christianity, Marxism, Freud, and Naturalism</strong> are among the theories we will look at this semester.  The course is a survey of six theories concerning the nature of humanity.  There will be three tests.</p>
Philosophy of LifeOnlineJordan, Jeffrey J.jjjordan<p>​<strong>Plato, Christianity, Marxism, Freud, and Naturalism</strong> are among the theories we will look at this semester.  The course is a survey of six theories concerning the nature of humanity.  There will be three tests.<br></p>
Great Western PhilosophersTR 2:00-3:15Rogers, Katherinkrogers<p>Western Philosophy began over two thousand years ago in Greece when people began to ask, “What is really real?” “How can I know anything?” and “What am I doing here, anyway?”  In Great Western Philosophers we take an introductory look, in chronological order, at some of the most important thinkers and ideas from ancient Greece to the present, including, for example, Aristotle on the Happy Life, Thomas Aquinas on God,  and Descartes on doubt and certainty. The course is divided into four sections with a multiple-choice test after each section.<br></p>
Great Western PhilosophersOnlineRogers, Katherinkrogers<p>Western Philosophy began over two thousand years ago in Greece when people began to ask, “What is really real?” “How can I know anything?” and “What am I doing here, anyway?”  In Great Western Philosophers we take an introductory look, in chronological order, at some of the most important thinkers and ideas from ancient Greece to the present, including, for example, Aristotle on the Happy Life, Thomas Aquinas on God,  and Descartes on doubt and certainty. The course is divided into four sections with a multiple-choice test after each section. </p>
Introduction to PhilosophyTR 12:30-1:45 pmShabo, Sethsshabo<p>​This course provides an introduction to the problems and methods of philosophy as an academic discipline.  We will focus on four traditional areas of philosophical debate, including the existence of God, the mind-body problem, knowledge and skepticism, and free will and determinism.  In each of the four areas, we will look closely at influential arguments and positions with a view to understanding and critically evaluating them.  Grading will be based on four in-class essay exams as well as class participation. </p>
Critical ThinkingMWF 11:15-12:05Cushing, Jeremy jcushing<p>​No matter what field you work in, it is essential to be able to think clearly, assess evidence accurately, and communicate your ideas effectively. This course serves as an introduction to a range of philosophical tools designed to help us do just that. Topics covered will include deductive logic (truth-functional logic and basic predicate logic), scientific reasoning (induction, causal reasoning, probability, and statistics), and informal logic (argument mapping and logical fallacies). <br></p>
Social and Political PhilosophyMWF 12:20-1:10 Koltonski, Danieldkoltons<p>This course provides an introduction to Western political philosophy via an examination of three core values that have governed political debate since the Reformation: freedom, equality and community. We will consider them individually: ‘What is it to be a free individual?’ ‘Why is equality important?’ We will consider political debates that rely on them: ‘Is capitalism justified because it allows people to exercise their freedom in the marketplace?’ ‘Or is it unjustified because it deprives some of their freedom?’ ‘Does the demand for social equality require some sort of economic egalitarianism?’ ‘Does respect for freedom require that individuals have a robust right to free expression?’ And, finally, we will consider whether realizing one of them either requires or precludes realizing another: ‘Does allowing persons economic freedom prevent us from realizing a society of equals?’ ‘Or can we only be truly free when we live among equals?’ </p>
Social and Political PhilosophyTR 12:30-1:45Lee, Hsin-wenhwl<p>​The course considers some important topics in contemporary political philosophy, including political responsibility, distributive justice, democracy, and political obligation. The issues we will consider include the problem of dirty hands, the problem of many hands, libertarianism, liberalism, democracy, epistocracy, political obligation, and civil disobedience.  <br></p>
Social and Political Philosophy TR 11:00-12:15 pmLee, Hsin-wenhwl<p>The course considers some important topics in contemporary political philosophy, including political responsibility, distributive justice, democracy, and political obligation. The issues we will consider include the problem of dirty hands, the problem of many hands, libertarianism, liberalism, democracy, epistocracy, political obligation, and civil disobedience.  <br></p>
Contemporary Moral ProblemsTR 12:30-1:45 pmLee, Hsin-wenhwl<p>The moral issues we will consider include abortion, genetic enhancement, euthanasia, the death penalty, recreational use of drugs, sexual intimacy and marriage, motherhood and the workplace, freedom of speech, global justice, war and terrorism, animal rights and environmental ethics. Students will learn relevant arguments from both sides. The aim is to help students to develop and defend their own views.  </p>
Contemporary Moral ProblemsMWF 2:30-3:20 PMHanley, Richardhanley<p>​In conducting our ordinary lives, we often need answers to ethical questions.  Some of the most serious are literally matters of life and death.  These force us to ask questions like:  is it ever okay to kill another member of the human species?  Is it always okay to kill things which are not members of the human species?  We shall consider issues like abortion, infanticide, contraception, euthanasia, capital punishment, warfare, and the welfare of future generations, animals, the environment, and of those less fortunate than ourselves.  Along the way, we'll construct a picture of a plausible ethical theory, engaging questions like, "Are there any objectively correct answers in ethics?" and "Does ethics depend upon religion?"  Students will emerge from the course in a position to make a worthwhile contribution to the discussion of ethical issues in our society. </p>
Ethics MWF 1:25-2:15 pmKoltonski, Danieldkoltons<p>We will be concerned to see whether there is anything to be said in a principled way about right and wrong.  The bulk of the course will be an in-depth examination of two central traditions in post-Reformation Western moral philosophy, exemplified by John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant.  But first we will briefly consider moral relativism, a position that many find initially attractive.  At the end of the course, we will also look at contemporary discussions of the relation between the demands of morality and those personal obligations that spring from friendships.  </p>
EthicsMWF 2:30-3:20 PMKoltonski, Danieldkoltons<p>​We will be concerned to see whether there is anything to be said in a principled way about right and wrong.  The bulk of the course will be an in-depth examination of two central traditions in post-Reformation Western moral philosophy, exemplified by John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant.  But first we will briefly consider moral relativism, a position that many find initially attractive.  At the end of the course, we will also look at contemporary discussions of the relation between the demands of morality and those personal obligations that spring from friendships.<br></p>
EthicsMWF 2:30-3:20 PMKoltonski, Danieldkoltons<p>We will be concerned to see whether there is anything to be said in a principled way about right and wrong.  The bulk of the course will be an in-depth examination of two central traditions in post-Reformation Western moral philosophy, exemplified by John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant.  But first we will briefly consider moral relativism, a position that many find initially attractive.  At the end of the course, we will also look at contemporary discussions of the relation between the demands of morality and those personal obligations that spring from friendships.  <br></p>
World ReligionsMWF 10:10-11:00Fox, Alan Davidafox<p>In this course we will take a critical yet sympathetic view of a wide range of religious traditions, including Native American Religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  This will require that we allow ourselves both to identify with and maintain our distance from each of the traditions covered.  We propose to explore textual and historical roots and fundamental concerns, and to look for similarities and differences.  We will not be experts on World Religions after taking this course, but we will be more sensitive to the kinds of issues at stake in the study of religion, and more familiar with the origins and evolutions of today’s living religions, both Eastern and Western. </p>
LogicMWF 10:10-11:00Draper, Kailakai<p>Elementary symbolic logic of truth-functions and quantification.  This course covers deductive reasoning:  patterns of argument that are logically conclusive by virtue of their form alone.  A formal language is developed for expressing the structure of arguments involving connectives like "and", "or", and quantifiers like "all", "some", "no".  When translated into this formal language, arguments in ordinary English can be proved valid or invalid, and sentences can be evaluated as logically true, logically false, or contingent.<br></p>
LogicMWF 11:15-12:05Hanley, Richardhanley<p>Elementary symbolic logic of truth-functions and quantification.  This course covers deductive reasoning:  patterns of argument that are logically conclusive by virtue of their form alone.  A formal language is developed for expressing the structure of arguments involving connectives like "and", "or", and quantifiers like "all", "some", "no".  When translated into this formal language, arguments in ordinary English can be proved valid or invalid, and sentences can be evaluated as logically true, logically false, or contingent.</p>
LogicTR 11:00-12:15Draper, Kailakai<p> </p><p>Elementary symbolic logic of truth-functions and quantification.  This course covers deductive reasoning:  patterns of argument that are logically conclusive by virtue of their form alone.  A formal language is developed for expressing the structure of arguments involving connectives like "and", "or", and quantifiers like "all", "some", "no".  When translated into this formal language, arguments in ordinary English can be proved valid or invalid, and sentences can be evaluated as logically true, logically false, or contingent.</p>
Scientific ReasoningMWF 11:15-12:05Swanson, Noelnswanson<p> </p><p>Critical survey of basic concepts and forms of inductive reasoning. Applications to the physical, social and biomedical sciences. Topics include: interpretations of probability, probabilistic fallacies, methods of statistical induction, logic of hypothesis testing, judging correlations, criteria of causation, experimental design and definitions of confirmation.</p>
Introduction to Jewish Philosophy MW 3:35-4:50 pm (Online)<p>​Hein (Cross List:  JWST208-010)<br></p><p>Fundamental issues in philosophy of religion reflecting both general theological approaches to resolving the tension between philosophy and religion and the uniquely Jewish attempt to do so. Topics include: God, miracles, good and evil, divine commandments and free will.</p>
Introduction to Feminist TheoryMWF 11:15-12:05 pm<p>​Laberge (Cross List:  WOMS216-010)</p><p>This course explores the various theoretical explanations for and solutions to gender inequality. The development of feminist theory will be presented as an intellectual history placing each theoretical framework in conversation with the others covered during the course of the semester. Students will become familiar with a variety of feminist theories including: liberal, Marxist, socialist, transnational, radical, homosexual, multicultural, psychoanalytic, cultural, standpoint, social construction, multiethnic/racial, postmodern, and queer. Our understanding of these theoretical perspectives will be aided by the inclusion of current case studies and class debates.<br></p>
Intro. to Feminist TheoryMWF 12:20-1:10 pm<p>​Laberge (Cross List:  WOMS216-010)</p><p>This course explores the various theoretical explanations for and solutions to gender inequality. The development of feminist theory will be presented as an intellectual history placing each theoretical framework in conversation with the others covered during the course of the semester. Students will become familiar with a variety of feminist theories including: liberal, Marxist, socialist, transnational, radical, homosexual, multicultural, psychoanalytic, cultural, standpoint, social construction, multiethnic/racial, postmodern, and queer. Our understanding of these theoretical perspectives will be aided by the inclusion of current case studies and class debates.</p>
Medieval PhilosophyTR 3:30-4:45 pmRogers, Katherinkrogers<p> </p><p>Medieval Philosophy deals with the synthesis of Greek philosophy and biblical religion.  We start with some background in Ancient Greek philosophy and Plotinus, the Neoplatonist who had a profound impact on later thought. Major figures include Christian philosophers, Augustine, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus and William of Ockham; Islamic philosophers, Avicenna, Alghazali, and Averroes; and Jewish philosopher, Maimonides,   Though the material is presented chronologically, the key question throughout will be whether or not the ideas we study are philosophically viable today.  Topics will include: Proving God, Evil, Freedom, Causation, Knowledge,  The Good Life, Universals, Time, and more.  There will be three essay tests, two short papers, and quizzes on assigned reading.  </p>
Ancient PhilosophyTR 2:00-3:15 pmDraper, Kailakai<p>​The course is divided into six topics: the significance of being mortal, the possibility and nature of change, the ideal society, the fundamental nature of reality, the nature of the mind, and the rationality of being moral.  We will consider the attempts of various ancient Greek philosophers to address these issues, with an emphasis on Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus.  Special attention will be given to Plato's <em>Republic</em>, widely recognized as one of the greatest works in Western literature.<br></p>
Intro. to Jewish MysticismMW 3:35-4:50 pm<p>Hein (Cross List:  JWST302-010)</p><p>Introduction to Kabbalah, or Jewish mysticism. It begins with an overview of the classic mystical text, the Zohar and the medieval-era Jewish mystic Isaac Luria. Its focus is Kabbalistic literature during the 18th century. Texts will be studied in the context of the rise of the pietistic Eastern European Jewish movement known as Hasidism. Key concepts of kabbalistic thought will be covered, including tzimtzum, the sefirot, the Jewish Sabbath, God and the Celestial Spheres.<br></p>
Modern PhilosophyTR 11:00-12:15 pmShabo, Sethsshabo<p>This course is a study of works of the major philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, including Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. In reading these works, we will come to understand some of their main positions and arguments in metaphysics and epistemology. In addition, we will come to appreciate how their discussions have shaped our contemporary understanding of such core philosophical problems as the nature of minds, what the physical world is like and what we can know about it, causation, and personal identity. </p>
Twentieth Century PhilosophyMWF 2:30-3:20 pmSwanson, Noelnswanson<p> </p><p>Major philosophical movements from the 20th century to the present. Includes logical empiricism and the recent criticism of this movement.</p>
Black Thought and PhilosophyMW 3:35-4:50 pm<p>Richardson (Cross List: AFRA 307-010) </p><p>Readings and discussions of Black philosophies, ideologies and concepts as reflected in the thought of significant Black figures. </p>
Indian Religion and PhilosophyMWF 2:30-3:20 PMFox, Alan Davidafox<p> This course will cover the philosophical and religious traditions in the Indian culture, including the Vedic tradition, Jainism, and the various philosophical schools of Hinduism.  Special emphasis will be placed on Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta.  We will also cover various more recent developments in Indian thought, including Sikhism and the works of modern thinkers such as Gandhi, Ramakrishna, and Aurobindo.</p><p> </p><p>The Honors section of Indian Religion and Philosophy will operate as a subsection of PHIL 309 sec. 010.  This means that besides the regular work load for the course, students will be expected to meet for an additional discussion every other Wednesday immediately following the regular class throughout the semester.  This means that students with extremely complex or restricted schedules may not be able to take part.  We will read additional, more in-depth and sophisticated materials, and will spend more time working with traditional texts.  Increased emphasis will be placed on class participation, in both the regular and the additional honors section meetings.  Class is limited to ten students.  </p>
Killing and Let DieTR 8:00-9:15 amGreene, Markmkgreene<p>Doctors are generally forbidden to actively cause the death of terminally ill patients who are in great pain and want to die. However, they are allowed to withhold treatment from such patients, knowing this will hasten death. Both practices share the morally salient feature that they result in avoidable earlier death. Why is killing condemned but letting die allowed? We will explore this and the acts /omissions asymmetry more generally. It seems that there are cases in which moral attitudes diverge despite equivalence of ethically relevant features. Are such asymmetries real or only apparent? What do they mean for the ethical systems in which they arise? <br></p>
MetaphysicsMWF 11:15-12:05 pmHanley, Richardhanley<p> </p><p>Metaphysics is the study of how and what things really are.  Modern analytic metaphysics has been especially concerned with modality (the nature of necessity and possibility), personal identity, the mind‑body problem, the nature of time, causation, and freedom of the will; and has been characterized by a fine attention to language and logic.  We shall touch on all these concerns, with the focus on modality, an area which in the 1980s saw the publication of two revolutionary works, by Saul Kripke and David Lewis.</p>
Medical EthicsTR 11:00-12:15 pmGreene, Markmkgreene<p> </p><p>Seminar focuses on such topics as experimentation with human subjects, professional practice, and moral problems in health care. RESTRICTIONS: For students of BMEG.  This course does not satisfy A&S 2nd writing requirement.</p>
Philosophy of LawMWF 2:30-3:20 PMDraper, Kailakai<p>This course examines fundamental issues in the philosophy of law, including the nature and content of law, its relation to morality, theories of legal interpretation, and the obligation to obey the law, as well as philosophical issues and problems associated with punishment and responsibility, liberty, and legal ethics.  <br></p>
Environmental EthicsTR 3:30-4:45 pmPowers, Thomas M.tpowers<p>​(Cross List:  UAPP 448-010)</p><p>Ethical problems associated with environmental protection, local, national, and international. Relations to social and political movements. Seminar format<br></p>
Senior SeminarMWF 12:00-1:15 pmPust, Joeljpust<p>Debunking and Disagreement <em>(Satisfies A&S second writing requirement)</em></p><p> </p><p>Two arguments for skepticism about philosophy considered. Debunking arguments claim our beliefs are undermined because our mental states are not properly explained by their subject matter. Arguments from disagreement claim our beliefs are undermined because our epistemic peers disagree with us.</p>
Seminar: Ethics in Data Science and AIW 6:00-8:00 pmPowers, Thomas M.tpowers<p> </p><p>Seminar on societal impacts of data gathering and analysis, with applications in health sciences, disaster science, policing, and e-commerce. Participation-based format. Topics include: privacy, algorithmic biases and data incompleteness, profiling, safety, and informed consent.</p>

Page Settings and MetaData:
(Not Shown on the Page)
Page Settings
Current Courses
No
MetaData for Search Engine Optimization
Current Courses
<a target="_blank" href="/Lists/CurrentCourses/AllItems.aspx" class="ms-promotedActionButton"><span style="font-size:16px;margin-right:5px;position:relative;top:2px;" class="fa fa-pencil-square-o"></span><span class="ms-promotedActionButton-text">EDIT LIST</span></a>
  • Department of Philosophy
  • 24 Kent Way
  • University of Delaware
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • Phone: 302-831-2359
  • philosophy@udel.edu